Wet & Dry Rot

Wet & Dry Rot Treatments North East

Dry Rot is the most serious form of fungal decay in a building. The decay is caused by a certain species of fungi called Serpula lacrymans, also known as True Dry Rot, that digests parts of the wood which gives the wood strength and stiffness.

Dry Rot is very destructive. It has the ability to pass through inert material to spread to other timbers. The mature fruiting bodies of wood-destroying fungi that develop during an attack produce millions of microscopic spores which are widely dispersed by air currents. Falling on untreated timber they will germinate to form a mass of hyphal threads called mycelium.

Dry Rot affects timbers which are exposed to damp conditions and where there is a general lack of ventilation. Externally exposed timber, timber in contact with wet soil or masonry, or timber subject to a damp atmosphere can all suffer from fungal attack.

Typical indications of dry rot being present include shrinking , darkening and cracks appearing in the timber. Under humid conditions a white fluffy ‘cotton wool’ mycelium develops. Under less humid conditions, a grey/ mushroom coloured skin with patches of yellow often develops. Fruiting bodies are soft, fleshy pancakes with an orange surface. Rust red coloured spore dust are frequently seen around fruiting bodies. The active decay often produces a musty, damp odour.

What is wet rot?

Dry Rot is the most serious form of fungal decay in a building. The decay is caused by a certain species of fungi called Serpula lacrymans, also known as True Dry Rot, that digests parts of the wood which gives the wood strength and stiffness.

Dry Rot is very destructive. It has the ability to pass through inert material to spread to other timbers. The mature fruiting bodies of wood-destroying fungi that develop during an attack produce millions of microscopic spores which are widely dispersed by air currents. Falling on untreated timber they will germinate to form a mass of hyphal threads called mycelium.

Dry Rot affects timbers which are exposed to damp conditions and where there is a general lack of ventilation. Externally exposed timber, timber in contact with wet soil or masonry, or timber subject to a damp atmosphere can all suffer from fungal attack.

Typical indications of dry rot being present include shrinking , darkening and cracks appearing in the timber. Under humid conditions a white fluffy ‘cotton wool’ mycelium develops. Under less humid conditions, a grey/ mushroom coloured skin with patches of yellow often develops. Fruiting bodies are soft, fleshy pancakes with an orange surface. Rust red coloured spore dust are frequently seen around fruiting bodies. The active decay often produces a musty, damp odour.

The source

  • Wet rot is caused by high moisture content and most commonly occurs in very damp areas or areas with poor ventilation.
  • The first signs would usually be rotting of skirting boards and floorboards.

Action to be taken

  • As with all kinds of rot, the first step of wet rot treatment would be to determine the source of the moisture.
  • Timbers severely infected with fungal growth need to be removed & replaced, while those which are still serviceable may be retained and treated
  • In severe cases of wet rot, chemical damp proofing of affected walls may be necessary

 

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